Adequan (polysulfated glycosamino-glycan): Prescription medication used in dogs for the control of signs associated with non-infectious degenerative and/or traumatic arthritis of canine synovial joints and following surgical procedures involving a joint.

Amoxicillin -When to try amoxicillin, metronidazole, and liquid Carafate we have found that our dogs benefit tremendously from a course or two of: amoxicillin or azithromycin, metronidazole, and bismuth (a good substitute is Pepto Bismol caplets – not chewable) when regurgitation seems to have increased a considerable amount, and everything else that might cause it has been reasonably ruled out. Bacterial overgrowth seems to cause this problem and sometimes along with some actual vomiting (but not usually with vomiting) and the triple therapy ends the problem (sends it back to being about “normal” for the dog) in about 3-4 days.

Azithromycin (also called Doxycycline):
Popular treatment option in veterinary medicine for many types of infections including dermatological infections, urogenital infections, respiratory tract infections and otitis media. Used by veterinarians to treat a wide range of bacterial infections in dogs and cats including streptococci, staphylococci, bartonella henselae, some species of Chlamydia, haemophilus spp, mycoplasma spp, borrelia burgdorferi and others. The medicine works by binding to the P site of the 50S ribosomal subunit of those microorganisms that are susceptible to it, thereby interrupting the microorganism’s RNA-dependent protein synthesis.

Baytril:  Most common antibiotic used to treat aspiration pneumonia (AP) though others have also been used.

Bethanchol
: Primarily to tone the bladder, but research has shown that in cases it has also helped the esophagus. Pro-motility drugs that help move food through the digestive system more quickly so there is less chance of it being regurgitated.

Here is a good link about Bethanchol use (mainly related to bladder issue), but it list side effects etc.. http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_bethanechol_chloride.html

Be aware that it can cause an increase urge to urinate (as it is a medication used to stimulate urinary function), so may need a few extra potty breaks (but I never noticed too much difference, as puppies need to go every few hours anyway). Also if the dose is too high it can cause vomiting/regurg.

Bismuth: Uses of Bismuth Subsalicylate for Dogs and Cats Subsalicylate, an aspirin-like compound, can decrease diarrhea caused by intestinal infections. The bismuth component of Pepto-Bismol has been shown to suppress the bacteria that cause ulcers and stomach inflammation in people. This bacterium is called Helicobacter. It is a good substitute is Pepto Bismol caplets and not chewable.

Carafate (also called Sucralfate): Understand what Carafate is and what it isn’t. It is essentially a substance that coats mucous membrane to create a “bandage” over it. It doesn’t neutralize acid, doesn’t inhibit acid production – none of that. It is not a “prn” medication (i.e., as needed). It can, however, 1) bind with food if not given away from mealtimes; 2) inhibit the absorption of certain antibiotics if given to close to administration of abx. It is a preventive, or at tool to heal inflammation.

It Bandages ulcerations or abrasions in the esophagus or stomach. Carafate should be given one hour before or two hours after any other meds or food. If treating STOMACH issues, the tablet can be given by itself, as it will pass through the esophagus and disintegrate in the stomach and bandage any ulcers or erosions. If treating the ESOPHAGUS, we need the Carafate in liquid form; either the suspension, or crushing it in about a tsp. of water and administering it w/a syringe. That way, it will bandage the esophagus on the way down. Additionally, if there ARE any stomach issues, once the Carafate
solution gets into the stomach, it will help there, also. (Quoting group member Dr. Kathy). Others have reported it has helped cut down with the excess of mucus in the esophagus.

Carafate/Sucralfate is a med that works to help heal an irritated esophagus due to acid reflux or too much regurgitation. This drug must be given in liquid form (must dissolve the pills in water) and has to be given either 1 hour before or 2 hours after other meds or food to cause it to bind to the esophageal wall rather than to the food or other meds.

Cephalexin: Most common antibiotic used to treat aspiration pneumonia (AP) though others have also been used.

Cerenia: Anti-nausea drug; NOTE: PUTTING CERENIA INJECTABLE IN THE FRIDGE MAKES IT STING LESS!!!

Cipro: Most common antibiotic used to treat aspiration pneumonia (AP) though others have also been used.

Cisapride: Pro-motility drugs that help move food through the digestive system more quickly so there is less chance of it being regurgitated.

Clavamox: Most common antibiotic used to treat aspiration pneumonia (AP) though others have also been used.

Doxycycline (also called Azithromycin): Popular treatment option in veterinary medicine for many types of infections including dermatological infections, urogenital infections, respiratory tract infections and otitis media. Used by veterinarians to treat a wide range of bacterial infections in dogs and cats including streptococci, staphylococci, bartonella henselae, some species of Chlamydia, haemophilus spp, mycoplasma spp, borrelia burgdorferi and others. The medicine works by binding to the P site of the 50S ribosomal subunit of those microorganisms that are susceptible to it, thereby interrupting the microorganism’s RNA-dependent protein synthesis.

Erythromycin:
When used as a low dose, pro-motility drugs that help move food through the digestive system more quickly so there is less chance of it being regurgitated.

Famotidine (also called Pepsid): Acid inhibitor that helps to reduce regurgitation by reducing the acid produced and acid reflux.

Flagyl (also called Metronidazole): Prescribed to take care of a protozoal infection. This class of infections includes Giardia or Trichomonas. Commonly when given to dogs, this drug is termed as Flagyl. Anaerobic infections in dogs generally occur at sites such as mouth, gastrointestinal tract, deep wounds, vagina, internal organs and surgery or wound locations. Metronidazole for dogs also acts against a prevalent irritable bowel syndrome thanks to its immune modulating activity in addition to non-specific diarrhea. Veterinarians also recommend this drug for periodontal problems, an onset of tetanus and cases of pancreatic insufficiency along with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Severe liver ailments can also be brought under control using this medication. Metronidazole is found to work best for dogs when it is given to them along with their meals. A common complaint with regards to this medicine is its bitter taste. To overcome this, various flavors and different types of the drug are being created. This huge variety has a bearing on the strength of the dosage, its duration and the use of the drug itself. Metronidazole is also often given in combination with other drugs to treat severe infections.

Mestinon (also called Pyridostigmine Bromide): Prescription medication used to treat Myasthenia Gravis (MG). Contains the active substance Pyridostigmine and is in a class of drugs called a cholinesterase inhibitor. http://www.petplace.com/drug-library/pyridostigmine-mestinon/page1.aspx

Metaclopromide (also called Reglan): Pro-motility drugs that help move food through the digestive system more quickly so there is less chance of it being regurgitated.

Metronidazole (also called Flagyl): Prescribed to take care of a protozoal infection. This class of infections includes Giardia or Trichomonas. Commonly when given to dogs, this drug is termed as Flagyl. Anaerobic infections in dogs generally occur at sites such as mouth, gastrointestinal tract, deep wounds, vagina, internal organs and surgery or wound locations. Metronidazole for dogs also acts against a prevalent irritable bowel syndrome thanks to its immune modulating activity in addition to non-specific diarrhea. Veterinarians also recommend this drug for periodontal problems, an onset of tetanus and cases of pancreatic insufficiency along with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Severe liver ailments can also be brought under control using this medication. Metronidazole is found to work best for dogs when it is given to them along with their meals. A common complaint with regards to this medicine is its bitter taste. To overcome this, various flavors and different types of the drug are being created. This huge variety has a bearing on the strength of the dosage, its duration and the use of the drug itself. Metronidazole is also often given in combination with other drugs to treat severe infections.

Mirtazapine (also called Remeron): Anti-nausea drug

Nexium:
Less commonly used acid reducer.

Omeprazole  (also called Prilosec): Acid inhibitor that helps to reduce regurgitation by reducing the acid produced and acid reflux.

Prilosec (also called Omeprazole): Acid inhibitor that helps to reduce regurgitation by reducing the acid produced and acid reflux.

Pyridostigmine Bromide (also called Mestinon): Most common use is for Myasthenia Gravis (MG). http://www.petplace.com/drug-library/pyridostigmine-mestinon/page1.aspx

Reglan (also called Metaclopromide): Pro-motility drugs that help move food through the digestive system more quickly so there is less chance of it being regurgitated. Reglan has anti-nausea effects in some dogs

Remeron (also called Mirtazapione): Anti-nausea drug

Sulcrafate (also called Carafate): Sucralfate/Carafate – requires a prescription. Although the tabs can be dissolved after crushing, it seems that the liquid works better on the esophagus. Please note that Sucralfate can be given as often as three times a day, but NOT with meals….it must be given at least 1 hour before or two hours after meals…..the point is to AVOID giving it anywhere near food because it forms a gel-like coating to soothe and help heal the esophagus….and you don’t want the “gel” to bind with any food or meds. We usually gave it very early morning (3-5 when xxxxxx would have the worst acid reflux),mid-afternoon and around 8, before her last meal of the night. The sucralfate and Carafate work the same…they are basically the same thing.

Sucralfate/Carafate is a med that works to help heal an irritated esophagus due to acid reflux or too much regurgitation. This drug must be given in liquid form (must dissolve the pills in water) and has to be given either 1 hour before or 2 hours after other meds or food to cause it to bind to the esophageal wall rather than to the food or other meds.

Zantac: Less commonly used acid reducer. Pro-motility drugs that help move food through the digestive system more quickly so there is less chance of it being regurgitated.